Monday, August 12, 2013

How to build your own Uzi from a parts kit. Now a motion picture.

No sooner than I got the last parts in that I needed to finish my Uzi,  than a new kit arrived on my doorstep. This kit is a German/European kit, and is in great shape. It also came with what is known as a "center repair section" from the good folks at Global Machine and Tool. The repair section speeds up the build process by a factor of 10 compared to piecing together a bunch of demilled receiver chunks. You take some measurements, square off your front and rear receiver pieces, weld them on the ends of the repair section, (making sure your blocking bar is welded in as well), and then weld in a couple of small semi-auto pieces like a feed ramp and a stock mounting block, then rivet in an ejector, and you're done.
An inexperienced builder could finish an Uzi in a matter of hours if they used the GM&T repair piece.

Anyway, here's the video. I'm about as much of a film artist as I am a gunsmith, which is to say, not much.
Enjoy.

15 comments:

  1. Nicely done. Heading to the range soon?

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  2. In spite of your disclaimer, that was some of the most scintillating footage I think I've ever seen.
    I particularly liked the dark blue sock puppet that kept appearing in the foreground.
    Snort, lmao..crap michelob ultra right in my keyboard! ;)
    You make this look so straight forward and simple. I can do only one thing I saw in your cinematic adventure, or the text of the post...rivet.
    You have an innate gift for fabrication.

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  3. Dark blue sock puppet? o.0
    Too many michelobs, KX. =)

    Thanks for your kind words. I put this up there to show anyone considering trying their hand at it, that there is no real "magic" to it.
    The Uzi is very straightforward, and is a good weekend project if you've got an experienced builder helping you at, say, a build party.

    P.S. I wouldn't call it a gift, gifts don't come at the expense of scars. =)

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  4. awesome just grabbed the vid to watch on my lunch today this is how i am doing my build is with the "repair section" .. but taking my time as i have to still pick up a few parts and waiting to hear from D&D if the parts are instock ...

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it.
      Put some pic links up when you finish yours.

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    2. i may do a thread over that the guild i haven't posted there in a couple of years ;)

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    3. Can't wait to see it!

      I've got a couple more Uzi builds to do, and one of them will be on here for sure, since it's not going to be a regular ol' Uzi.

      Keep an eye out!

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    4. i have this build and want to do a mini but need to find someone that can do a full sized bolt for me first, no mill here so cant do it myself and no answer from D&D on there 45acp bolts so at a standstill until i find a bolt reasonably ... BTW if you like stens APEX has MKII for 119 and MKIII for like 70 right now ;) .. builders helping builders ..lol

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    5. Yeah, I saw the Sten kits, thought about picking up a few, but I've already got a box of MK3s sitting here waiting to be built. =)

      I can guarantee that D&D is out of everything bolt related.

      The bolts are easy to convert if annealed first. I converted one the other day with just a drill press and a angle grinder.

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    6. Have a link to the "kingsford" meathod by any chance, could send it off to "nevada" but i am lazy and do rather do it myself

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    7. Simple, heat it up in fiery hot coals in your grill, then let the coals burn down to ashes with the bolt in the middle of them. Give the whole thing a day or two to cool, then removed the bolt.
      The bolt will need to get dull-red-hot before slowly cooling over a day, so make sure you stoke the fires real hot.

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  5. My kingdom for a SA bolt (9mm). Why can't I find one anywhere for ANY price. Should I go buy a mill and welder and start cutting and adding? Is there no other way? (been looking for 3 years now)

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    1. That's what I do. I don't see any sense in paying 200-300 bucks for a bolt when I already have one that came with the kit. Anneal it, drill it, and some quick cuts, and you're done.
      I have actually successfully converted a bolt with a drill press and a cut-off wheel on a Dremel. It's not real easy, but it's do-able.

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  6. Looks like a project well done indeed!

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